Friday, 5 April 2019

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The Rules of Management A definitive code for managerial success


Some people find management so easy. They glide effortlessly onwards and upwards through the system, the politics, the people problems, the impossible targets and the work overload. They always seem to say the right thing, do the right thing and know instinctively how to handle every situation. These golden principles show you how to inspire your team to perform (and what to do when it doesn't). They reveal the secrets of managing yourself and your team in a way that gets results. Your life will be easier. Your successes will be greater. And when you are headhunted or promoted (again) nobody will be surprised. Least of all you.


Good to Great Why Some Companies Make the Leap and Others Don't


The Challenge 
Built to Last, the defining management study of the nineties, showed how great companies triumph over time and how long-term sustained performance can be engineered into the DNA of an enterprise from the verybeginning.

But what about the company that is not born with great DNA? How can good companies, mediocre companies, even bad companies achieve enduring greatness?

The Study 
For years, this question preyed on the mind of Jim Collins. Are there companies that defy gravity and convert long-term mediocrity or worse into long-term superiority? And if so, what are the universal distinguishing characteristics that cause a company to go from good to great?

The Standards 
Using tough benchmarks, Collins and his research team identified a set of elite companies that made the leap to great results and sustained those results for at least fifteen years. How great? After the leap, the good-to-great companies generated cumulative stock returns that beat the general stock market by an average of seven times in fifteen years, better than twice the results delivered by a composite index of the world's greatest companies, including Coca-Cola, Intel, General Electric, and Merck.

The Comparisons 
The research team contrasted the good-to-great companies with a carefully selected set of comparison companies that failed to make the leap from good to great. What was different? Why did one set of companies become truly great performers while the other set remained only good?

Over five years, the team analyzed the histories of all twenty-eight companies in the study. After sifting through mountains of data and thousands of pages of interviews, Collins and his crew discovered the key determinants of greatness -- why some companies make the leap and others don't.

The Findings
The findings of the Good to Great study will surprise many readers and shed light on virtually every area of management strategy and practice. The findings include:

Level 5 Leaders: The research team was shocked to discover the type of leadership required to achieve greatness.
The Hedgehog Concept (Simplicity within the Three Circles): To go from good to great requires transcending the curse of competence.
A Culture of Discipline: When you combine a culture of discipline with an ethic of entrepreneurship, you get the magical alchemy of great results. Technology Accelerators: Good-to-great companies think differently about the role of technology.
The Flywheel and the Doom Loop: Those who launch radical change programs and wrenching restructurings will almost certainly fail to make the leap.
"Some of the key concepts discerned in the study," comments Jim Collins, "fly in the face of our modern business culture and will, quite frankly, upset some people."

Perhaps, but who can afford to ignore these findings?


Time Talent Energy Overcome Organizational Drag and Unleash Your Team’s Productive Power


Managing Your Scarcest ResourcesBusiness leaders know that the key to competitive success is smart management of scarce resources. That?s why companies allocate their financial capital so carefully. But capital today is cheap and abundant, no longer a source of advantage. The truly scarce resources now are the time, the talent, and the energy of the people in your organization?resources that are too often squandered. There?s plenty of advice about how to manage them, but most of it focuses on individual actions. What?s really needed are organizational solutions that can unleash a company?s full productive power and enable it to outpace competitors.Building off of the popular Harvard Business Review article ?Your Scarcest Resource,? Michael Mankins and Eric Garton, Bain & Company experts in organizational design and effectiveness, present new research into how you can liberate people?s time, talent, and energy and unleash your organization?s productive power. They identify the specific causes of organizational drag?the collection of institutional factors that slow things down, decrease output, and drain people?s energy?and then offer a pragmatic framework for how managers can overcome it. With practical advice for using the framework and in-depth examples of how the best companies manage their people?s time, talent, and energy with as much discipline as they do their financial capital, this book shows managers how to create a virtuous circle of high performance.

‘The authors suggest investing time as carefully as you invest money, and have concrete suggestions.’
Business Traveller, February 2, 2017 by Tom Otley

“If you are reading this during a meeting, you are not alone. Web browsing is just one example of dysfunctional meeting behaviour chronicled in Time, Talent, Energy. The book cites studies showing such distractions cause a fall in IQ twice as great as that achieved by smoking marijuana.”
Financial Times

“The book's great insight is that companies utilize a plethora of tools to manage money, and manage financials to the nth degree, but that approach is less successful than companies which put a greater focus on managing employee time, talent and energy.” 
Forbes

“There are some good examples of successful companies and the strategies they have employed within these pages – not all of them well known – and some great quotes.” 
Business Traveller

“Time, Talent, Energy hammers home the link between making better use of the hours at work and the Holy Grail of productivity. Mankins and Garton [point out] that time is just one component of human capital. Companies that effectively manage not just time but also their talent find themselves with the additional energy that is a crucial differentiator between them and their competitors... Quite simply, companies with inspired employees perform better than the rest.”
Forbes.com 


Secrets of Success at Work 50 Strategies to Excel


Why do highly successful professionals know that the rest of us don't? Do they have a secret recipe for success? Is there a special alchemy at work? The Secrets of Success at Work reveals the 50 things you need to know to achieve all your professional goals, whatever your ambition. Some will surprise you, and all will inspire you. Put these 50 simple strategies together and you have a recipe for success in teh workplace, a proven formula that will unlock the secrets and uncover your potential.

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